The Best Museums & Art Galleries in Dijon – Mus3ums

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Dijon / France

Dijon ) is in the prefecture of the Côte-d'Or department and Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region in Northeastern France.The earliest archaeological finds within the city limits of Dijon date to the Neolithic period. Dijon later became a Roman settlement named Divio, located on the road from Lyon to Paris. The province was home to the Dukes of Burgundy from the early 11th until the late 15th centuries, and Dijon was a place of tremendous wealth and power, one of the great European centres of art, learning, and science. In 2017, the commune had a population of 156,920; the Greater Dijon area had 250,516 inhabitants in 2007. The city has retained varied architectural styles from many of the main periods of the past millennium, including Capetian, Gothic, and Renaissance. Many still-inhabited town houses in the city's central district date from the 18th century and earlier. Dijon architecture is distinguished by, among other things, toits bourguignons made of tiles glazed in terracotta, green, yellow, and black and arranged in geometric patterns. Dijon holds an International and Gastronomic Fair every year in autumn. With over 500 exhibitors and 200,000 visitors every year, it is one of the ten most important fairs in France. Dijon is also home, every three years, to the international flower show Florissimo. Dijon is famous for Dijon mustard, which originated in 1856, when Jean Naigeon of Dijon substituted verjuice, the acidic "green" juice of not-quite-ripe grapes, for vinegar in the traditional mustard recipe. The historical centre of the city has been registered since 4 July 2015 as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Musée Magnin

Dijon / France

The Musée Magnin is a national museum in the French city of Dijon in Burgundy, with a collection of around 2,000 works of art collected by Maurice Magnin and his sister Jeanne and bequeathed to the state in 1938 along with the hôtel Lantin, a 17th-century hôtel particulier in the old-town quarter of Dijon where it is now displayed as an amateur collector's cabinet of curiosities and as the Magnin family home.

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dijon

Dijon / France

The Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dijon is a museum of fine arts opened in 1787 in Dijon, France. It is one of the main and oldest museums of France. It is located in the historic city centre of Dijon and housed in the former ducal palace which was the headquarters of the Burgundy State in the 15th century. When the duchy was assimilated to the Kingdom of France, the palace became the house of the King. In the 17th century it became the Palace of the Dukes of Burgundy following a project by Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Since 2006, the museum has been in a process of full renovation and extension. First, the work focused on one part including the renovated route “Middle-Ages – Renaissance”, inaugurated on September 7th 2013. The fully-renovated museum displaying 1500 works of art in 50 different rooms was inaugurated on May 17th 2019 in the presence of the Minister for Culture Franck Riester, the former French President François Hollande and the Mayor François Rebsamen.

Champmol

Dijon / France

The Chartreuse de Champmol, formally the Chartreuse de la Sainte-Trinité de Champmol, was a Carthusian monastery on the outskirts of Dijon, which is now in France, but in the 15th century was the capital of the Duchy of Burgundy. The monastery was founded in 1383 by Duke Philip the Bold to provide a dynastic burial place for the Valois Dukes of Burgundy, and operated until it was dissolved in 1791, during the French Revolution. Called "the grandest project in a reign renowned for extravagance", it was lavishly enriched with works of art, and the dispersed remnants of its collection remain key to the understanding of the art of the period.