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The Hague / Netherlands

The Hague or 's‑Gravenhage [ˌsxraːvəˈɦaːɣə] ) is a city on the western coast of the Netherlands on the North Sea and the capital of the province of South Holland. It is also the seat of government of the Netherlands and hosts the International Court of Justice, one of the most important courts in the world. With a metropolitan population of more than 1 million, it is the third-largest city in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam and Rotterdam. The Rotterdam–The Hague metropolitan area, with a population of approximately 2.7 million, is the 13th-largest in the European Union and the most populous in the country. In the west of the Netherlands, The Hague is in the centre of the Haaglanden conurbation and lies at the southwest corner of the larger Randstad conurbation. The Hague is the seat of the Cabinet, the States General, the Supreme Court, and the Council of State of the Netherlands, but the city is not the constitutional capital of the Netherlands, which is Amsterdam. King Willem-Alexander lives in Huis ten Bosch and works at the Noordeinde Palace in The Hague, together with Queen Máxima. Most foreign embassies in the Netherlands are located in the city. The Hague is also home to the world headquarters of Royal Dutch Shell and other Dutch companies. The Hague is known as the home of international law and arbitration. The International Court of Justice, the main judicial arm of the United Nations, is located in the city, as well as the International Criminal Court, the Permanent Court of Arbitration, Europol, and approximately 200 other international governmental organisations.

Mauritshuis

The Hague / Netherlands

The Mauritshuis is an art museum in The Hague, Netherlands. The museum houses the Royal Cabinet of Paintings which consists of 854 objects, mostly Dutch Golden Age paintings. The collections contains works by Johannes Vermeer, Rembrandt van Rijn, Jan Steen, Paulus Potter, Frans Hals, Jacob van Ruisdael, Hans Holbein the Younger, and others. Originally, the 17th century building was the residence of count John Maurice of Nassau. It is now the property of the government of the Netherlands and is listed in the top 100 Dutch heritage sites.

Kunstmuseum Den Haag

The Hague / Netherlands

The Kunstmuseum Den Haag is an art museum in The Hague in the Netherlands, founded in 1866 as the 'Museum voor Moderne Kunst'. Later, until 1998, it was known as 'Haags Gemeentemuseum', and until the end of September 2019 as 'Gemeentemuseum Den Haag'. It is renowned for its large Mondrian collection, the largest in the world. His last work, Victory Boogie-Woogie, is on display here. The museum building was constructed between 1931–1935, designed by the Dutch architect H.P. Berlage.GEM and Fotomuseum Den Haag are part of the Kunstmuseum, though not housed in the same building and with a separate entrance fee.

Huis ten Bosch

The Hague / Netherlands

Huis ten Bosch is a royal palace in The Hague, Netherlands. It is one of three official residences of the Dutch monarch; the two others being the Noordeinde Palace in The Hague and the Royal Palace in Amsterdam. Huis ten Bosch was the former home of Queen Beatrix from 1981 to 2014, until her abdication; King Willem-Alexander and his family moved in on 13 January 2019. A replica of the palace was built in Sasebo, Japan, in a theme park bearing the same name.

Museum Bredius

The Hague / Netherlands

Museum Bredius is a museum named after Abraham Bredius on the Lange Vijverberg in The Hague. It is remarkable for its collection of etchings and paintings, but is most attractive to visitors for its accurate restoration of the 18th-century Herenhuis interior with period furnishings.

Royal Library of the Netherlands

The Hague / Netherlands

The Royal Library of the Netherlands is the national library of the Netherlands, based in The Hague, founded in 1798. The KB collects everything that is published in and concerning the Netherlands, from medieval literature to today's publications. About 7 million publications are stored in the stockrooms, including books, newspapers, magazines and maps. The KB also offers many digital services, such as the national online Library , Delpher and The Memory. Since 2015, the KB has played a coordinating role for the network of the public library.

Museum Meermanno

The Hague / Netherlands

Museum Meermanno – House of the Book , formerly called Museum Meermanno-Westreenianum, is a museum named after Willem Hendrik Jacob van Westreenen van Tiellandt on the Prinsessegracht 30 in The Hague. It is remarkable for its collection of sculpture, books, etchings, and paintings, but is most attractive to visitors for its accurate upkeep of the 18th century Herenhuis interior with period furnishings and collectibles.

Peace Palace

The Hague / Netherlands

The Peace Palace is an international law administrative building in The Hague, the Netherlands. It houses the International Court of Justice , the Permanent Court of Arbitration , The Hague Academy of International Law and the Peace Palace Library. The Palace officially opened on 28 August 1913, and was originally built to provide a home for the PCA, a court created to end war by the Hague Convention of 1899. Andrew Dickson White, whose efforts were instrumental in creating the court, secured from Scottish-American steel magnate Andrew Carnegie US$1.5 million to build the Peace Palace. The European Heritage Label was awarded to the Peace Palace on 8 April 2014.

Royal Academy of Art, The Hague

The Hague / Netherlands

The Royal Academy of Art is a renowned art and design academy in The Hague. Succeeding the Haagsche Teeken-Academie , the academy was founded on 29 September 1682, making it the oldest in the Netherlands and one of the oldest in the world. The academy has been the training ground for a number of significant artists of the Hague School. It was part of the art movement of Dutch Impressionism and in the immediate vicinity of the II. Golden Age of Dutch painting. In the 19th century, however, training was still strongly oriented towards the classic curriculum. At the end of the 19th century, the academy had opened to Modernism, too.